Show me.

On April 9, 2018, in Sunshine Cathedral, by Rev.Dr. Robert

Show me. Preached by Rev. Anne R. Atwell Sunday, April 8, 2018 Let us pray, “Divine Spirit of goodness and of light…guide us so that we may not be instruments of our own or other’s oppression. And may the words of my mouth and the meditations of all our hearts bring peace and healing to […]

Show me.
Preached by Rev. Anne R. Atwell
Sunday, April 8, 2018

Let us pray, “Divine Spirit of goodness and of light…guide us so that we may not be instruments of our own or other’s oppression. And may the words of my mouth and the meditations of all our hearts bring peace and healing to our world. Amen.”

Many of you know that I grew up in a very small town in Northwestern/North Central Pennsylvania. It is quite a rural area which relied heavily on manufacturing jobs to keep the economy afloat. Of course, much of the manufacturing industry has either closed its doors or moved out of the country entirely. And that leaves many people, who have lived in this rural area their entire lives, out of work OR working at a job which doesn’t provide a living wage. There are also those who are simply too old or too ill to leave the area in search of greater economic stability, so they’re stuck in a most difficult situation. And because this is such a rural area, there aren’t the caring resources available to assist those who happen to be in such dire straits.

One of the resources that has disappeared from this small, rural area is any organization which will provide a hot meal to those who might otherwise go without and so the local faith based communities banded together to create their own Food Sharing Program. They wanted to ensure that no one in their area would go hungry.

My mother is part of one of these faith based communities. Every Wednesday morning she gets up bright and early, goes down to her church, and she along with about eight other women bake casseroles, slice bread, cut freshly baked cake into pieces to be shared, and they put together lunches for about 50 homebound folks. And not only do they create and then pack the meals, they drive together in small groups to deliver the meals, checking in on those who need a friendly face. Now, on the surface, this may seem pretty simple….but most of these women, who are in their 70’s and 80’s, saw a need in their community and are working hard to fill that need. They may not be able to change the world, but they can do something. And that “something” is very important to those who are in need of their outreach.

In the gospel message we just heard, the writer of John shares that after Jesus’ crucifixion, his disciples were gathered together behind locked doors for fear of the religious authorities. Can you imagine how they must have been feeling? Grieving, scared, wondering what had happened? Suddenly, out of nowhere, Jesus appears. The passage from John’s gospel doesn’t say how Jesus got in the room – just that he showed up and spoke with the gathered group.

So, the disciples are gathered together, mourning the death of their dear friend and Jesus breaks into that secure place, that space of feeling safe and sound and away from the troubles. And Jesus speaks to them…“Peace be with you. As I was sent, so I send you.” When Jesus breathes on them, filling them with the Holy Spirit, he instructs them on the ways of forgiveness.

According to this passage, Jesus appears again a week later bidding the group, “Peace. Peace be with you.” When Jesus speaks to Thomas, he doesn’t admonish him. Jesus invites Thomas to believe in the goodness that can occur when you least expect it. After everything the disciples had been through, I have to think it would have been difficult to believe that Jesus had returned. So I don’t dwell on the doubt that Thomas had. I actually have kind of a soft spot for the guy.

Now, this story, this allegory, is rich with lessons, with instructions as to what we need to do as followers of Jesus’ message. It is a reminder to us that Easter doesn’t end on Easter Sunday and that resurrection is not an isolated event. It continues on and on, every time new beginnings occur, every time evil and suffering do not win, every time death does not get the final word, there is resurrection.
During both visits that Jesus has with the gathered group, both times he offered them “Peace.” And what we need to know is that the peace that Jesus offers really isn’t our conception of peace, as something tranquil, as something serene. No, what Jesus was doing was encouraging his followers to be peace-makers. Now, that’s very different than what many of us imagine, isn’t it?? He tells them “As I was sent, so I send you.” His instructions are clear; the disciples have received their commission. Get out there and do the work of being a peace-maker by stepping-up, by showing-up, by making a difference. He tells them to stir the waters, to make waves when injustice is witnessed, when those who have no voice are treated unfairly. Jesus is encouraging his followers to move from their comfort zone and to welcome the outcast, the marginalized, and to turn upside down all society’s oppressive conventions which have been normalized. But, and this is a big one, to commit to this type of peacemaking is costly. The disciples knew that. They saw what Jesus went through and I’m sure they thought long and hard about the cost of following Jesus and what it would mean for them.

You know, people don’t often want to hear that in order to truly fulfill the kin-dom of God, social status and privilege must be set aside. Oh no, we don’t want that! This peace-making must move us from behind closed and locked doors.
The noted philosopher “anonymous” reminds us that peacemaking actually looks something like this.

“Peacemaking doesn’t mean passivity. It is the act of interrupting injustice without mirroring injustice, the act of disarming evil without destroying the evildoer, the act of finding a third way that is neither fight nor flight but the careful, demanding pursuit of reconciliation and justice. It is about a revolution of love that is big enough to set both the oppressed and the oppressors free. Peacemaking is about being able to recognize in the face of the oppressed our own faces, and in the hands of the oppressors our own hands.”

This past Wednesday, we marked the 50th anniversary of the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The group from Sunshine Cathedral’s Civil Rights tour was actually in Memphis this past Wednesday, April 4, which was the date of the anniversary. And when I think of those who worked as peacemakers, those who worked so hard, who spoke out against injustice and inequality and violence, I immediately think of Dr. King. He advanced the cause of civil rights by using non-violence and civil disobedience as his tactics. He organized marches and boycotts so that those who were considered the “least of these” by the U.S. society would obtain equal rights. Dr. King worked for peace and for justice for people of color and he worked to fulfill the gospel message by following the footsteps of Jesus. Dr. King wrote, “Never, never be afraid to do what’s right, especially if the well-being of a person or animal is at stake. Society’s punishments are small compared to the wounds we inflict on our soul when we look the other way.” Dr. King was a peacemaker even when others worked to silence his voice.

Being a peacemaker certainly isn’t for the faint of heart – particularly in a world that is being torn apart by war, where guns are so prevalent and people’s lives are marred by violence at home and in the schools. And it can be scary to be that voice that calls out injustice; that calls out inequality; that calls out discrimination. We may have people, our loved ones, our family and friends, telling us that we should simply mind our own business, we should follow the status quo, and we should just keep the peace. But if we keep quiet about things that matter, there is no peace. There may be quiet, but there is no peace. We must set aside our fear, our reticence and be the peacemakers that our world desperately needs.

Feminist writer and womanist theologian Audre Lorde wrote, “When I dare to be powerful, to use my strength in the service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid.”

During my sermon preparation research, I saw something that I had not seem before. For those faith communities who follow a lectionary…either the narrative lectionary or the revised common lectionary, this Sunday is call the Second Sunday of Easter. The Second Sunday of Easter. Please note that it is not called the Second Sunday since Easter or the Second Sunday after Easter and now we don’t have to go to church or do much of anything until at least Advent or Christmas! This Second Sunday of Easter reminds us that the Easter message continues. That evil and suffering and even death do not get the final word! That new life and new beginnings can occur at any time and that Jesus may show up when we least expect it – in the faces of those we meet every day.

After Thomas heard of the disciple’s encounter with Jesus, Thomas told them, “Unless I see…I will not believe.” Thomas said, “Show me.” I need to see this of which you speak! Show me and I will believe. I have this image of Jesus saying the same to us. Show me, my dear ones, how you will continue to live out the Easter message. Show me how you will truly welcome all people into this community. Not just those who look like you but ALL people. Show me how you will work to break down systems that oppress those in society’s margins. Show me how you will reach out to women and children, the transgender community, those who lack adequate food and shelter and medical care, those refugees who are literally running for their lives. Show me how resurrection power, how only goodness and love will fill your lives. Show me how you will be a peace-maker in this world.

The Dalai Lama reminds us, “The planet does not need more ‘successful people.’ The planet desperately needs more peacemakers, healers, restorers, storytellers, and lovers of all kinds.”

My friends, it really is up to us to make a difference in this world. As we move from this place and carry the Easter message of resurrection power out into our world, know that the Divine One is calling to each of us…Show me and all people compassion and equality. Show me and all people kindness and justice. Show me your care as well as your action. Show me that you are a peace-maker!

This is the good news,
Amen.

~~~~~
I will show compassion to all.
I will show kindness to all.
I will show care for all.
I will work for peace.
And so it is.
Amen.

Comments are closed.



Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can
take care of it!

Visit our friends!

A few highly recommended friends...